steroids debate

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Steroids debate organon ballistae analysis

Steroids debate

First, athletes who choose not to use steroids are at an unfair advantage — most will be unable to compete at the same level as athletes who are using steroids. Thus, steroid use is contrary to the spirit of sport — fairness, respect, and solidarity. The concept of mutual respect between competitors is thwarted when one or both athletes would rather use steroids to improve his or her performance than compete based on individual strength, skill, or talent.

Law students, and indeed lawyers, are fond of the slippery slope argument. I think it finds a comfortable place in this debate. Where is the line to be drawn? Will it now be illegal to use steroids only if taken without proper medical supervision? How can proper medical supervision be proven? How does an athlete prove that the steroids in his or her body were as a result of proper medical supervision and not other means?

What about athletes who use more than the recommended dose? What about other forms of doping hGh or EPO? Are those next to be permitted under proper medical supervision? The only way to preserve integrity in sport and protect the health of athletes is through a serious anti-doping approach.

Although a long way from perfect, WADA has created the most comprehensive anti-doping program in the world indeed the only anti-doping program most of the world outside of the US models and implements. American professional sports leagues should be looking at ways to model the WADA code in its own anti-doping policies like the United States Anti-Doping Agency is doing , not seeking ways to excuse steroid use or compromise anti-doping efforts.

Steroids have no place in sports. What about medical technology that repairs worn-out human parts? How many athletes have had joint repairs? Adding another risk on top of that is simply another dangerous choice made. Many people have been the beneficiaries of using illegal steroids. In baseball, it has made many owners and players very rich. The idea that no one knew players were using steroids and PEDs is preposterous.

They all knew and chose to get rich rather than protect the integrity of the sport. Likewise, in cycling doping made many riders rich. We live in an odd country. Some people who use illegal drugs spend their lives in prison; others become rich. If there is significant money to be made, illegal steroid use is simply granted a free pass by all those involved. The fraud that baseball became, based on the illegal usage of steroids, HGH and other drugs, is a classic case.

Given the choice between getting rich and exposing the fraud, baseball teams — owners and players alike — chose to get rich. They took the money and left the public holding the bag. Steroids are a problem in sports to be sure, but the temptation is just too great to ever fully eradicate the matter. This question epitomizes the steroid problem in sports.

Whether or not such substances are banned, there will always be the impulse by someone to try it anyway — to improve their situation and to garner ever greater fame, success, and wealth. He gave everyone a free pass. They all basically claimed the law, the CBA, or some other reason kept them from doing something about it.

No, all Bud Selig had to do was speak out. Finally it was the players but everyone claimed there was no proof even though formerly skinny players began to look like Hulk Hogan. Players cheating and breaking the law by even having steroids without prescriptions is one thing. The fraud that was perpetrated on the fans to induce them to buy tickets is another. In the end, it was Congress that exposed the fraud and demanded action, not MLB.

I agree with the article, steroids truly have no place in sports. Steroids should not be used even for medical reasons because they have such a negative effect on the human body. Even looking from a non-heath point of view, when players use steroids they are giving themselves an unfair advantage.

The stronger and faster players are also the ones going to be the one breaking the records. Which is unfair for earlier athletes, who might still hold some records in their desired sport, because they worked hard and did not use steroids. What Brent Musburger said to the Montana students is really quite disturbing. Being such a popular figure in sports and going and saying that steroids work really creates a bad image for him.

Sure steroids work but are they right to use, no. Its bad enough we have professional athletes, who children look to as role models, using steroids. The game has changed dramatically from what it used to be. Today, in most cases athletes are playing for themselves. They want to be the best and have the largest paycheck. It has really revolutionized from being a team sport into an individual sport.

I personally think in order to completely stop steroids in sports every sports league needs to have a zero-tolerance policy. Having this zero-tolerance policy will hopefully send a message to all athletes to not use steroids. Doping scandals are increasing in frequency. Levels of competition at the Olympics, in professional and NCAA sports reflects an implicit mandate that illegal drugs be used by players, or that those players should quit and give up their aspirations to be competitive at higher levels.

Infrequent testing completely nullifies the scientific reliability of testing as evidence of non-use. Methodological inadequacies undoubtedly exist intentionally, so that players can use in the off season and not get caught, and so universities and pro leagues can keep the big revenues coming in.

At some top universities, sports revenues are greater than tuition. Head coaches are often the highest paid person on the payroll at unis. Those same unis educate the nation and world, and they teach people to implicitly accept, support, and habituate negligence, inadequate testing, white collar crime, and abuses associated with sports doping.

The rest are somewhere in the domino line in the USA. Steroids only have a negative effect given misuse and abuse. The suggestion that steroid hormones should not be used in medicine is flatly absurd. Taking these drugs could be considered cheating as well. While there are many players in sports taking Performance Enhancing Drugs, there are still many who do not.

For the ones who do not use them, they put in hours of hard work to get stronger for the sport they play. Athletes that do take them get the same effect in a much shorter time frame and many of the drugs they take give them more energy to work out harder and longer.

They also do not show the true skills that a player may possess. For example, if a baseball player is a weak hitter but then takes steroids and works out while he is on them, he will get really big and strong and start to crush the baseball, then he is showing the skills that the drugs helped him create.

As baseballs flew out of the park off the bats of Sammy Sosa and Mark McGwire, reports swirled that McGwire had been using creatine, as well as more illegal supplements like steroids. With good reason, scrutiny over such a hallowed record like the single-season home run record was now in full swing.

In no other sport can merely looking at the numbers give you a profile of the player. Every time a batter steps into the box, you see his average, home runs, and RBI without a doubt. Having 3, hits, home runs, and wins for a pitcher almost immediately indicate a Hall of Fame worthy career.

We speak of seasons as impressive, 30 plus home run-hitters as sluggers, and 20 win pitchers as dominant. Records for more than years now are still remembered by baseball, and exist to some extent in the modern era to be broken. MLB is all about the numbers, but the steroids abuse epidemic should alarm sports fans in America's other favorite pastime. Maybe it's because the NFL has a stricter substance-abuse policy or because MLB relies so much on the value of statistics for its history.

For whatever reason, the unbalanced attention is more threatening to the integrity of the game of professional football than baseball. Consider the case of Shawne Merriman. After a Pro-Bowl season in , Merriman received a league-imposed suspension of four weeks for testing positive for steroids. He finished the season with 17 sacks—tops in the league—despite only playing in 12 games. If you thought he should have won, then you need to keep reading this article.

Hopefully, most of you have already seen the problem. He was caught. He was punished. The story ended. He plays two more seasons. A man was literally caught cheating to gain a competitive edge, which he clearly had by basically outplaying everyone else on the field in the entire league, was suspended four games for it, and is still considered one of the top players in the entire league today. Barry Bonds, who has yet to concretely be proven as a cheater, has already been violently kicked into the abyss by Leonidas and the rest of America San Francisco mostly excluded , while shouting "THIS Why such a Jekyll and Hyde game with the media?

Why don't people care more? Maybe the numbers are more important. But take a closer look at the two games themselves and steroids are far greater a threat to football than baseball. Prolific hitter Pete Rose once said, "See the ball, hit the ball. Scientists remark about the wonders of human hand-eye coordination to be able to do the most complex of tasks. The challenge still remains that most of the 6 billion people on earth can't hit a 94 mph blur hurled toward them from only 60 feet, six inches away.

Reserve, first bodybuilder to use steroids consider

After reading the book I convinced myself I was correct to not get involved with Anabolic Steroids. I am a huge research freak. The research shows by all the agencies that the video showed, as well as 20 different accredited University studies. Here is just a tidbit from Dr. Stories of Eastern-bloc athletes receiving testosterone and anabolic-androgenic steroids as part of their training regimens as early as the s abound.

The Eastern-bloc weightlifters and track athletes subsequently ruled the athletic stage for decades. The degree to which anabolic-androgenic steroids affect performance enhancement in healthy athletes is widely debated, as are the precise mechanisms of action. Certainly anecdotal evidence, including increases in strength and lean body mass LBM , is reported, but steroid effect is difficult to study in a true placebo-controlled double-blind fashion. Most athletes would notice testicular atrophy if receiving anabolic-androgenic steroids, which interferes with the double-blind structure.

Dosing, nutrition, and training parameters would need to be monitored extensively to completely satisfy the most critical review. Certainly, the use of anabolic-androgenic steroids has become a worldwide phenomenon, slowly trickling down to collegiate, high school, and even junior high levels. The reality is that steroids can be harmful when used by adolescent boys because of the massive production of testosterone being produced in their own bodies during puberty.

Introducing synthetic testosterone can limit production in the future and can minimize masculine characteristics promoted by naturally produced testosterone. This is going to be weird to write but there really is no evidence that anabolic steroids are harmful to adult men over the age of Every death to bodybuilders, football players and other athletes group steroids in the death but the death usually was caused by another drug that was used such as diuretics.

I am by no means promoting the use of steroids but there is absolutely no evidence that supports the claims that steroid use can cause death or proposed maladies. I wonder what is actually going to come from all of this? Use other steroids to. I',m monitored by docs and if used right and you understand what your injecting and taking AI's you do not get the automatizing effects of androgen's to estrogen's take HCG or HMG with it use to prevent you're LH and FSH stimulated and keep you from going impotent and from your testes shrinking.

Hair loss is not a problem unless your predisposed. WIth AI's no bloat no high blood pressure. No gynecomastia aka bitch tits the list goes on their not bad just don't use them in competitions but to better yourself personally have at it. Men can become women and vice versa but a man can improve himself because he want;s to wtf. People smoke and drink them to death and steroids are way healthier and safe than both.

S Roid rage isn't real. I'm 50, was in horrible health, fat, low T, high blood pressure, bad lipid panel results, bad knee and shoulder, overall just a fat middle aged guy. Now I'm shredded with a six pack, have a spectacular diet, exercise daily, feel great, have a massive sex drive, super confident, no bad joints thanks nandrolone , in the best health I've been in since my 20's. Steroids have been nothing but positive for me.

Oh yeah, being with much younger women and having virtually every woman of any age look at you is an added bonus. Steroids are good if taken properly. It could be considered cheating if taken for sports minus powerlifting and bodybuilding. The long term effects haven't really been proven but several old bodybuilders are still in great shape, like Arnold Schwarzenegger, Frank Zane, fanco Columbus and more.

Also injectable steroids are much healthier than oral because oral has a greater effect on your kidneys. Society has blackballed the use of gear because they do not understand it well enough. And its the idiots who mis-use it that give it a bad rep. Its unfortunate that its view upon it are so negative. People need to prep know length of use, dosage, side effects and how to minimize those side effects.

If taken properly with the appropriate doses, healthy eating and excersise then steroids are relatively harmless, no worse than smoking and drinking anyway. However steroids can be very dangerous when misused which is why I wouldn't advise anyone to take them without knowing all about the substance they intend to take, what dosages are correct and sticking to them, and just as importantly to know what aftercare is required after coming off the steroids.

A good anti estrogen after a cycle is essential and sometimes required during the course of steroids themselves. Blood pressure should be monitored before and during use as a side effect which can happen is high blood pressure. Unless someone has the correct knowledge, is prepared to take the precautions and knows the potential side effects and risks then there is no problem with them taking the drugs.

Unfortunately many take steroids not knowing what they are actually doing and encounter problems because of it. The side effects of Steroids far outweigh the positive side. Yes they do improve performance and make you stronger but the risk is much worse. Anabolic steroid abuse may lead to serious, even permanent, health problems such as: kidney problems or failure.

Liver damage. Enlarged heart, high blood pressure, and changes in blood cholesterol, all of which increase the risk of stroke and heart attack. Users can experience some pretty chilling side effects from; increased hair growth in unwanted areas, nausea, and aggression known as "Roid Rage". If you have ever seen a video of a Pro Athlete using Steroids, they will get thrown out of the game. Steroids are a drug, they are illegal.

If you take a completely objective look at it and I think that we all can agree that no matter what we shouldn't be doing something that involves doing ourselves harm by doing it. And seeing on how many side effects there are from steroids which can ruin your life or in many cases end it, there is no argument, objectively anabolic steroids are bad for your health, in return they are bad for you.

End of story. They are bad because they can make every person good at sport without hard training and i see the future that never will not go to the gym for train and so they go to inject new drugs that can made a strength body sponge body like things we see now Ex : sinthol and Steroids are another way of cheating yourself and the game.

15 YEAR OLD KID ON STEROIDS

But as society is increasingly invested in personal enhancers and sports become more technologically advanced, is drugging in sports all that bad? Join The Debate Cast your vote and join the conversation. Membership is free. Get Started. Warning message The subscription service is currently unavailable.

Please try again later. January 15, When we scheduled this event some, uh, five months ago, we had no idea it would be so timely. Just in the past month the, uh, Mitchell Report was released, naming some eighty eight Major League Baseball players alleged to have used steroids. Uh, record breaking sprinter Marion Jones was sentenced to six weeks in prison-, or six months, I should say,. Uh, Congressional hearings, uh, on steroid use and the Mitchell Report actually started today in Washington.

Well timely we certainly are, but what is the debate? This is not a debate about whether cheating in sports should be accepted. That would hardly be interesting. After all, we routinely use performance-enhancing drugs, uh, to enhance our, uh, mental performance.

A virtual pharmacopoeia of drugs is used to help people, including minors, stay awake, improve concentration, alter moods. And the whole point of competitive sports is for spectators to see athletes striving to be the very best they can be. We want their training and equipment to use the best science and technology. So why is the use of performance-enhancing drugs an exception? Is there persuasive evidence that these drugs are health risks? If so, how do those risks stack up against the risk athletes assume every day by getting into a racing car or a boxing ring, or on a football field or a baseball diamond?

And how should we think about the wisdom of rules that are inherently so intrusive and difficult to enforce? Well to help us grapple with these interesting questions, we have an exciting panel, including professional athletes and medical experts. And as our moderator, we have Bob Costas, perhaps the most famous sportscaster in television and radio today. Thank you again, Bob. The resolution being debated tonight is formally, you know what it is, but formally it is, we should accept performance-enhancing drugs in competitive sports.

Members of each team will alternate in presenting their side of the argument, and the presentations are limited to seven minutes each. Please pick up the keypad attached to the armrest on your left. For audience members sitting along the aisle to my right, your keypad is attached to the audience on your right side next to your neighbor.

So, the resolution is, we should accept performance-enhancing drugs in competitive sports. After my prompt, please press one to vote for the motion,. You may begin voting now. All right. Now to introduce the panel. And please hold your applause until all six are introduced. For the motion, former policy analyst for the Cato Institute,.

Professor of pediatrics and bio-ethics, and director of the program in medical ethics at the University of Wisconsin, Norman Fost. Against the motion, former host and creator of the Sports Machine, the award-winning sportscaster George Michael. For most of the evening as points of view are exchanged, all of us will be seated, but as each debater makes his initial seven minute presentation, we will call him to the podium.

Thank you. Everyone in this room uses performance-enhancing technology and drugs. We use cars and computers to make our work more efficient. We use caffeine, alcohol, and Viagra to improve our performance. We send our children to fancy schools and Suzuki lessons to improve their cognitive skills, and enhance their musical ability. And every athlete in recorded history has used performance-enhancing drugs. Babylonians and Romans used herbs to improve their performance in battle.

Naked Greeks put on shoes to run faster. Kenyan runners trained at altitude to improve their oxygen-carrying capacity. And runners everywhere carbo-loaded before races to enhance their performance. Why then, do we have a replay of the Salem witch trials? To discredit, humiliate, and incarcerate, uh, elite athletes for doing what has been a standard practice for millennia?

And why, out of the thousand and one ways in which athletes enhance their performance, have steroids and growth hormone been selected for particular vilification? But this begs the question, as Mr. Rosenkranz said, why are they banned in the first place?

We contend that the reasons given are morally incoherent, wreak of hypocrisy, and are based on ice cold wrong information. I will identify six reasons that are offered why we should ban these drugs. Number one, critics say that they confer an unfair advantage. The usual solution is to expand access. When Kenyan runners were found to enhance. The unfair advantage aim, uh, the unfair advantage claim is further undermined by rampant hypocrisy.

Johnson used a drug that was available to everyone, although illegally, virtually on the training room tables. Evans used a secret technology available to none of her competitors and bragged about it. The press cheered American ingenuity and made Johnson a pariah. Bud Selig, the baseball commissioner, preaches about a level playing field,. The Yankees always make the playoffs. We are told repeatedly that these drugs use heart disease, cancer, and stroke, while human growth hormone has been given to almost a million.

Oral testosterone dis-, did cause liver cancer, but for twenty years athletes have been using injectables, which have never been associated with cancer. Lyle Alzado the football player, was a poster child for the horrors of steroids. He died of a brain tumor. Then the New York Times and Sports Illustrated told us on cover stories that this was due to steroids.

That is deep-, deeply, deeply Freudian. Anabolic steroids do have undesirable side effects: acne, baldness, voice changes, intrangent infertility. The number of deaths from playing professional football and college football are fifty to a hundred times higher than even. More people have died playing baseball than have died of steroid use. But the first year that baseball did universal testing, anonymous testing, only six percent of the players were positive.

Coercion is the use or threat of force that's never occurred in this country to the best of my knowledge. Many walk away from it and choose not to do it, and no one is forced to take it on. Four, critics claim that steroids undermine fan interest, and this is simply empirically false, baseball attendance has ridden steadily in the steroid era, professional football is even more popular, and Barry Bonds, widely assumed to be a steroid user, is the biggest draw in sports, adding ten thousand fannies in the seats everywhere he goes.

Fifth, critics claim that steroids undermine the integrity of records. Baseball fences are shorter, the mound is lower, the ball is livelier, and Coors Field is a mile above sea level. The only valid comparison is with peers playing in the same arenas with the same equipment against the same opponents, and Ruth hit more home runs in one season than any other team.

He is in a league of his own, and no one has come close. One minute. The adverse effects are different, they stunt growth, they are not competent to make informed choices. I support testing in schools, not to punish the kids, but to catch the peddlers. Anyone caught selling drugs to children should be hung, followed by a fair trial. In closing, when you go out to dinner tonight, enjoy the wine that relaxes you, or start your day tomorrow with a double mocha latte that gets you going, but please be less critical of others who, like you, try to enhance their performance in a variety of ways.

Thank you, Dr. And now speaking against the motion, Dick Pound. I want to focus on two elements in this portion of my remarks: health and integrity. Sport, like this debate, is governed by rules, to which the participants agree. In fact, the rules are the essential element of sport as we know it. Some of them may seem arbitrary, why the race is a hundred meters as opposed to ninety-five or a hundred and five, but they are the rules, and they are the rules on which we agree.

One of those sport rules is that participants do not take certain drugs or use certain methods for performance enhancement. And also, we should be clear here, until there is a rule against the use of something, it may be foolish, it may be dangerous, but it can't be criticized as a breach of ethics or a rule of conduct.

Once there is a rule, however, that becomes the deal, and part of the game, whether the rule relates to drugs, equipment, or anything else central to the sport. You can find somebody who wants to play by the rules that you prefer. Almost all of the prohibited substances and methods have the potential to damage the health of the athletes. Shot putters went from throwing from sixty feet to seventy feet.

The initial anti-doping rules were adopted mainly as a result of concerns regarding health. A Danish cyclist died during the Olympics in Rome, that was the Olympics in which I participated. And he died as a result of drug use. He didn't just get sick, or incur a long term health problem, or fall off his bike and skin his knees.

He died. If a particular sport rule proves to be no good or unnecessary, or in need of amendment, the sport can change it. But you as a participant cannot do it unilaterally and clandestinely. Why do you suppose that no one, no one with any responsibility, let me underline that, is willing to say let the athletes do whatever they want? With the rules comes a question of trust.

We have expectations of each other that we play in accordance with the rules that we agreed upon as part of our participation, including rules prohibiting drug use. And the sport rules on drug use are no different from sport rules regarding such things as gambling. Pete Rose has been kept out of the Baseball Hall of Fame because of gambling, because nobody was really sure whether they were watching real sport.

In the, in more modern times, my, my view is that Henry Aaron has a record, Barry Bonds has a number. And drug use in sport is no more or no less than cheating, and in most cases, dangerous cheating. They do it to get an advantage. The use of performance enhancing drugs is not accidental, it is planned and deliberate with the sole objective of getting an unfair advantage. I was always struck by Vince Lombardi, a wonderful coach. So, going forward, what we need is an increased change of attitude.

It turns them, among other things, into liars. Marion Jones persisted with a lie for more than seven years. Ben Johnson lied to me in I was really looking forward to having him here tonight, twenty years later. But attitudes can change, even big attitudes like this. Drug use may not affect fan interest, but it should, and that's our failure as fans, compounding the failure of drug-using players in the leagues.

Please finish up. Bishop, let me finish with Bishop Fulton Sheen, he had a great thing. Even if everybody is doing it. Our thanks to Dick Pound, and uh, I indicate no disapproval of the opinions about to be expressed by Radley Balko when I note that he is ironically named to be on themselves panel.

Radley, Radley Balko, for the motion that performance enhancing drugs in competitive sports should be accepted. Well, let me start by saying, for those of you who might be confused, I am not Ben Johnson. Doing so reminded me of one of my favorite authors, Baltimore native H.

Is this about saving sport, or is this about some people imposing their view about what sport should be? Take representative Tom Davis, one of the more cam-, camera hungry politicians to demagogue this issue. After the census, Representative Davis maneuvered to have his Congressional District gerrymandered to include as many Republicans as possible, ensuring his continual reelection, eliminating the real number of options for his constituents to vote.

He ran the next year unopposed. Davis also snuck a, a provision into an unrelated piece of Federal legislation preventing an apartment complex from going up in his district because, he told the Washington Post, he feared it would bring too many Democrats into the district. Or you might talk about the particularly hellish world of thoroughbred horse racing jockeys, who subject themselves to sweat boxes, diuretics, suppositories, and intentional eating disorders.

So what about the children? Survey data actually shows that teen steroid use has mirrored the use of other elicit drugs over the years. So what is this debate really all about? Our society has an oddly schizophrenic relationship with pharmaceuticals and medical technology. If something could be said to be natural, we tend to be OK with it. But even synthetic drugs and man-made technology seem to be OK if the aim is to make sick people better, or broken people whole again. And so when we talk about expanding or transcending what we consider to be normal, uh, then a certain uneasiness starts to set in.

There was an article in The Chronicle of Higher Education last month about university professors taking stimulants like Adderall to increase their academic productivity. Oddly, the article quoted, quoted several professors who considered this cheating at academics. Academics is the search for truth and knowledge, if a drug can make that search more productive with few side effects, why in the world wouldn't you take it? As technology helped humanity obliterate a lot of these milestones, and helped us move beyond what, until a hundred years ago, had been a long, bleak history, similar advances over the years in nutrition, training, and using technology to improve technique have enabled sports records to fall with astonishing regularity.

Sports is about exploring and stretching the lengths of human potential. Going back to even the pre-modern Olympics, when athletes ate live bees, and ate crushed sheep testicles to get a leg up on the competition, uh, sports has never been about physical ability alone. It shouldn't be surprising, then, that many of the biggest proponents of banning performance enhancing drugs in sports are also suspect of some of these continued advancements in human achievement.

Kass who champions rigorous sports testing, has also spent much of his career actually lamenting the fact that human beings are living longer than ever before. He considers this contrary to some odd concept of natural order. Uh, of course there have been luddites and naturalists like Mr. The essence of the agreement today I think is what people like Mr. I think the difference is that I'm sort of willing to take a live and let live approach and let everyone sort of explore their own boundaries and their own potential.

Um, whereas I think some of our opponents are more interested in opposing their view of what is natural and what is, uh, human on everyone else, which of course brings us back to Mencken. I think, uh, our opponents want to legislate away what they believe are bad decisions, and if a free society means anything, it means we should be able to make all decisions, including the bad ones. Radley Balko, thank you. And now speaking against the motion, Dale Murphy.

Accurately just mentioned, studies, recent studies are showing that young athletes and high school kids are, are using performance enhancing drugs to a lesser degree. To legitimize, um, the performance enhancing drugs in sports I feel would send the wrong message to young athletes. There are certainly legitimate uses for human growth hormone and steroids, um, as, as we all know.

But to hit a baseball further, or to run a hundred yard dash faster is not the reason and the legitimate use of these, uh, of these drugs. Um, Dr. Fost mentioned that at one point in time there were six percent that were using, um, performance enhancing drugs in the major leagues. It really makes my point exactly. Um, if accepted, what about those, for instance, in Major League Baseball, what about those who do not want to use it?

The playing field, then, once again, is, is not level. Um, the only way, someone said earlier, the only way you could probably make this work is that if you forced everybody to take performance enhancing drugs, which um, we all know wouldn't work. You mentioned Barry Bonds adding, um, seats, um, fans in the seats every game he played. I would have to say that in San Francisco he was, um, generally accepted, but everywhere else he went, I think those ten thousand extra went there to jeer him and his accomplishments.

After the season, after all this has come out with Mark McGwire, I think most of us look back now and say we got caught up in something that we really didn't want to support. If there was no alternative, I could understand us giving into this problem. Certainly there are a lot of problems that young people have and society has.

But this is one of them. Um, and if there was no answer to, uh, this problem I think I would understand giving in, and voting, uh, in favor of this motion. But I believe that there is a pro—there is an answer to the problem. And, uh, as was mentioned earlier we look at smoking in public. There can be a change in culture in professional athletics, and I believe that it is starting.

We need, uh, better testing, harsher punishments, and, and people will decide not to get involved with performance-enhancing drugs. Uh, gambling in baseball is the perfect example. Um, the culture of, uh, professional baseball players is the one thing they know, and, and one thing they learn from the minute they sign a professional contract, is that if you gamble on the game in any way, shape or form, your career will be over.

I believe we can change the culture, and to accept this motion, really would set us back with the progress that we have made. After tonight, I think you will see—you will feel, uh, as you listen closely, that, you feel as I do, that there is no sustainable, logical, reasonable, um, uh… reason, for these things to be accepted. If you put any of these, uh, alleg—these, uh, positions under scrutiny, I think you will all come to understand, that we simply do not need this in sports at any level.

Let alone the high school kids that see professional athletes and are tempted to use them. And we are making progress, and studies have shown that. As far as baseball is concerned, certainly people like the long ball. Um, but, uh, this, this past year was, in the la—in the last 10 years, this past year, had the seventh fewest home runs of the last decade, and yet we broke records again with attendance. Attendance is good, home runs do not have to be up. People love the game, they appreciate the game, they appreciate finesse.

For instance— um, um, comparing, uh, anabolic steroids or performance-enhancing drugs to the Greeks wearing tennis shoes. Or to the ancient Greek athletes, uh, eating bees. Especially with our use. What concerns me is the example that the athletes at the highest level set for our youth. Dale Murphy, thank you. Dick Pound, you have stated that there are obvious health risks to the use of performance-enhancing drugs, steroids in particular.

Are those health risks truly obvious. Fost points out that, there have been more players killed, one at the major league level and many at the amateur level, playing baseball, than have been killed because of steroid use as baseball players. Me still? I—I would say that the, part of the difficulty with this is, is collecting data, both his and, and other data, because, for many years, all of this use has been clandestine, and hidden.

Radley Balko, uh, you are advocating a live-and-let-live approach to this. But all sports have rules which regulate the competition. No one can stop me in my back yard from using an aluminum bat if I wanna play a game of my own.

But they can in a major league game. Cork and saliva are perfectly natural and legal substances but not in the context of major league baseball. So why are these—why are these things analogous. Pound is right, when you enter into a league and you agree to, to compete, uh, you agree to a predetermined set of rules. Um, and I think that, you know, I think that athletes, uh, care about their bodies and they care about their, their earning potential.

I think, I think people, uh, have, I think athletes have a little bit, uh, more respect for their bodies than that. A huge percentage of them answer yes. Well, I mean and if, if the, you know, US Olympic Committee wants to, to, uh, set those rules, uh, you know, I, I, I think there are important distinctions to be drawn, uh, uh, between amateur athletics and professional athletics but, uh, you know, I—I think, uh, a couple ones, I think….

The finest, uh, Italian cyclist, Fausto Coppi was once asked, and winner of the Tour de France was once asked, uh…how often had he taken la bamba, or amphetamines during his career, he said, only when absolutely necessary. And when asked precisely how often that was he said, almost always. Another Tour de France, Jacques Anquetil in a debate with a French politician said, what do you expect us to do, ride the tour on mineral water?

Where our team agrees with, uh, Dick Pound and, and, uh, the opposition is that this is really only the tip of the iceberg. Not only has it failed, it must fail. Insulin-like growth factor can be injected into muscles, to improve muscular strength, it would have to be detected with a muscle biopsy. Uh, science has created super-mice capable of running six, uh, kilometers instead of meters, by altering their glucose metabolism.

We will not be able to detect these changes. Not only is the war on drugs bound to fail, uh, it also has other adverse effects, it reduces interest, this year, uh, in the Tour de France the race leader Michael Rasmussen, was, uh, sacked by his team on allegations of taking drugs.

What is policy and the current zero-tolerance approach to drugs in sport, is inconsistent and confused. Yet they all have exactly the same effect. Some enhancers have been permitted in sport. Caffeine increases the time to exhaustion, or reduces the time, uh, increases the time to exhaustion by 20 percent. None of these have had adverse effect on sport. You know it when you see it. Well of course D.

Professional classical musicians regularly take beta blockers to reduce, trim and enhance their performance. Indeed, just as we can increase the artistic expression through the use of beta blockers to enhance musical performance we could use them to enhance performance in archery, or indeed, in many, uh, sports requiring control of anxiety.

To recover from the grueling training necessary to run those times you need steroids to increa—increase recovery. To say that we should reduce…drugs in sport or eliminate them because they increase performance, is simply like saying that we should eliminate alcohol from parties because it increases sociability.

So our proposal, is that we allow a modest approach. We allow performance enhancers which are safe, and consistent with the risks that athletes already entail. No athlete today is dying in competition from taking EPO. Indeed I would prefer to take growth hormone prescribed by a doctor, than compete in professional American football, because I know of no ventilator-dependent quadriplegic caused by taking growth hormone. The drugs need to be consistent with the spirit of an activity, creating webbed hands and feet, which is possible, which is possible, would compromise the spirit of spearing— swimming.

But allowing athletes to recover from injuries consistent of sport. We should set limits, as the International Cycling Union has done, on the hermatocrit…and test health, not test for drugs. We are not horses or dogs, flogged to display our maximum biological potential, the spirit of being human, is to make choices.

To be human is to be better. But there are two ways to reduce cheating. One is to ramp up the war on drugs which is bound to fail, the other is to change the rule, the rules to allow regulated, supervised access. We agree that you should hear—adhere to the rules.

Julian Savulescu, thank you, and now our sixth and final debater, speaking against the motion, George Michael, George. Number one, the rules of the game say that steroids and for good reason, performance-enhancing drugs are absolutely illegal. Steroids however you have to know this. They will make you faster, they will make you stronger, and they make help you look and feel and be younger.

Steroids will make you wealthy. Steroids will make you famous. During the course of my preparation I talked to a Hall of Famer. I said let me ask you something. What if there were steroids now. Said, well. However…even though there is no clinical proof, let me repeat, there is no clinical proof that steroids directly lead to death, there are certain guys have suffered something, now, Lyle Alzado was mentioned. Lyle Alzado is—as—Alzado is not a name to me. I knew him, I interviewed him, I liked him.

When he graduated as a senior and he started steroids in as a freshman. When he graduated it was pound muscle mass. He died, at the age of Ken Caminiti. He tears his rotator cuff. Ken Caminiti was a good guy, a tough guy, a bull of a guy. He said I gotta get well, so he played even though he was in great pain. Said Ken.

So he did. He used so much steroids, that he became a giant of a man, he was bulging, Ken Caminiti went from hitting. Nobody wants to walk out on a field naked. He was the MVP of baseball in Eight years later he was dead, at the age of Even though, he was an ala—anabolic steroid type free. If any of you are Yankee fans, think back to The Yankees win the World Series. They have a relief pitcher you may or may not have heard of named Dan Naulty.

You ever heard of him, Bob? Guy said to him, Don, you gotta get on some steroids, man, you put some body on you. In he was with the Yankees, he weighed pounds. And it was all muscle. But he had to have major surgery because his veins were clotted against his arteries.

He had to have major surgery because he tore the muscle right off—the, the muscle and the groin completely off the bone. James Andrews, a man I consider to be one of the foremost absolutely best surgeons of all. That in , 17 percent…17 percent of total baseball payroll went to guys who were on the injured list with muscle tears, muscle strains, ruptured Achilles tendon, and on goes the list.

He said that we have had a percent increase in just the five years prior to Most of them accord9ing to Dr. Andrews, were related to their use of anabolic steroids. And you now wanna admit—legalize it, and govern it? The fraud that baseball became, based on the illegal usage of steroids, HGH and other drugs, is a classic case.

Given the choice between getting rich and exposing the fraud, baseball teams — owners and players alike — chose to get rich. They took the money and left the public holding the bag. Steroids are a problem in sports to be sure, but the temptation is just too great to ever fully eradicate the matter. This question epitomizes the steroid problem in sports. Whether or not such substances are banned, there will always be the impulse by someone to try it anyway — to improve their situation and to garner ever greater fame, success, and wealth.

He gave everyone a free pass. They all basically claimed the law, the CBA, or some other reason kept them from doing something about it. No, all Bud Selig had to do was speak out. Finally it was the players but everyone claimed there was no proof even though formerly skinny players began to look like Hulk Hogan.

Players cheating and breaking the law by even having steroids without prescriptions is one thing. The fraud that was perpetrated on the fans to induce them to buy tickets is another. In the end, it was Congress that exposed the fraud and demanded action, not MLB. I agree with the article, steroids truly have no place in sports. Steroids should not be used even for medical reasons because they have such a negative effect on the human body.

Even looking from a non-heath point of view, when players use steroids they are giving themselves an unfair advantage. The stronger and faster players are also the ones going to be the one breaking the records. Which is unfair for earlier athletes, who might still hold some records in their desired sport, because they worked hard and did not use steroids.

What Brent Musburger said to the Montana students is really quite disturbing. Being such a popular figure in sports and going and saying that steroids work really creates a bad image for him. Sure steroids work but are they right to use, no. Its bad enough we have professional athletes, who children look to as role models, using steroids.

The game has changed dramatically from what it used to be. Today, in most cases athletes are playing for themselves. They want to be the best and have the largest paycheck. It has really revolutionized from being a team sport into an individual sport. I personally think in order to completely stop steroids in sports every sports league needs to have a zero-tolerance policy.

Having this zero-tolerance policy will hopefully send a message to all athletes to not use steroids. Doping scandals are increasing in frequency. Levels of competition at the Olympics, in professional and NCAA sports reflects an implicit mandate that illegal drugs be used by players, or that those players should quit and give up their aspirations to be competitive at higher levels. Infrequent testing completely nullifies the scientific reliability of testing as evidence of non-use.

Methodological inadequacies undoubtedly exist intentionally, so that players can use in the off season and not get caught, and so universities and pro leagues can keep the big revenues coming in. At some top universities, sports revenues are greater than tuition. Head coaches are often the highest paid person on the payroll at unis. Those same unis educate the nation and world, and they teach people to implicitly accept, support, and habituate negligence, inadequate testing, white collar crime, and abuses associated with sports doping.

The rest are somewhere in the domino line in the USA. Steroids only have a negative effect given misuse and abuse. The suggestion that steroid hormones should not be used in medicine is flatly absurd. Taking these drugs could be considered cheating as well. While there are many players in sports taking Performance Enhancing Drugs, there are still many who do not.

For the ones who do not use them, they put in hours of hard work to get stronger for the sport they play. Athletes that do take them get the same effect in a much shorter time frame and many of the drugs they take give them more energy to work out harder and longer. They also do not show the true skills that a player may possess. For example, if a baseball player is a weak hitter but then takes steroids and works out while he is on them, he will get really big and strong and start to crush the baseball, then he is showing the skills that the drugs helped him create.

A Tuft University study showed that steroids can increase home run production by 50 percent showing that steroids are the reason why this weak hitter started crushing the baseball. Steroids help people get stronger a lot faster than if they did not take them. The focus of league officials would come back to the sport being played. Instead of them worrying about who has been taking Performance Enhancing drugs and how long they need to suspend that person for, they could worry about who hit a walk-off home run in the bottom of the 9th or who just won the gold in the Olympics all without worrying about what they did to get so good.

Performance enhancing drugs should not be allowed in any sport ever and the government should stay out of the entire struggle with these drugs in sports. The problems with Performance Enhancing drugs has proliferated over the years but if the government stepped in and tried to deal with it, it would just give them another responsibility that they may not be able to handle.

They may also be able to take steps that are too extreme, such as throwing people in jail. Performance enhancing drugs are profoundly harmful deleterious to the human body and should under no circumstances, be used in sports. They cause many life threatening illnesses such as heart attacks and disease.

Keep all Performance Enhancing drugs out of sports forever! Steroids should be banned because in professional Chris Benoit murdered his wife, his son and then himself; the cause was from steroids. Eddie Guerrero was another professional wrestler who died from heart failure in from steroid use.

Benoit and Guerrero were young. Marc Velasquez Chris Benoit did use steroids but what they say drove him to kill his wife and child was tramatic brain injury from taking bumps to the head over and over again. They said his brain was that of a year-old dementia patient. Eddy did steroids too but his heart problems were caused by years of hard drugs and prescription drug use not steroids. Steroids need to be illegal!!

It is not fair for people who work hard for their big muscles and who go to the gym everyday, and someone else just injects themself with a needle or whatever. And it is so horrible for the people who take steroids because it messes up your body so much!!! Steroids are just an excuse or an easy way to get bigger. People who uses steroids are just lazy to work for it or gain it themselves. Steroids should be allowed in professional sports, because after all, playing a professional sport is a job.

Why should someone be denied from something that will help them be better then their competitor. With concussions becoming such a big deal recently you would think people would want to stop athletes from getting even stronger and possibly giving more concussions to other players. Musberger should be ashamed of himself. Getting to the top of the mountain should be earned through discipline, hard work and perseverance — not by cheating or using a quick fix.

I disagree with you because, doping does affect the integrity of the sport along with the health of the athlete.

Sorry, non steroid ointment remarkable, the